Film, “Suicide: The Ripple Effect” brings message of hope, recovery and healing

By Allison Marlow
Posted 3/7/18

When Kevin Hines was 19 he attempted to end his own life by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge.

He survived.

Now he travels the globe advocating for improved mental health access and to …

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Film, “Suicide: The Ripple Effect” brings message of hope, recovery and healing

Posted

When Kevin Hines was 19 he attempted to end his own life by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge.

He survived.

Now he travels the globe advocating for improved mental health access and to spread a message of hope, recovery and wellness.

Next month, his film, “Suicide: The Ripple Effect” will premier in Daphne. Tickets are on sale now and a minimum number must be sold prior to opening night.

The film chronicles Hine’s personal journey and the ripple effect it has on those who have been impacted by his suicide attempt and his life's work since. In addition, the film highlights the stories of individuals and families who are utilizing their personal tragedy to bring hope and healing to others.

The film, local organizers said, is part of global mission to help reduce the number of suicide and suicide attempts through sharing stories of survival and recovery.

Kari Little, is with Live Now LLC a national organization committed to providing a better understanding of the intertwined nature of mental and physical health.

Little is spearheading the effort to bring the film to Baldwin County and said the viewing will include a panel discussion by local mental health experts, as well as information about local suicide prevention and awareness organizations such as the upcoming Out of Darkness Walk.

The film is not rated but is approved for ages 10 and up. Run time is 90 minutes.

The message in the film, Little said, a beacon for professionals who may work with those dealing with suicidal thoughts such as teachers, nurses, doctors and first responders. But, she added, the film is a must see for everyone.

“Suicide doesn’t discriminate,” she said. “It touches everyone from all different walks of life.”

Jessica Ryan, Ph.D, LPC, owner of Emerge Professional Counseling said suicide often feels like it happens without warning.

“If you talk to people who have experienced suicide by a loved one, they may have not been expecting it,” she said. “Often times they go back and see there may have been signs or things that might have been clues that would tell them this was a potential consequence.

“We do ourselves a disservice if we pretend suicide isn’t a possibility for the people in our lives,” Ryan said. “The more we know about it the more we can communicate.

She added, “Suicide is something people don’t want to talk about. The way we prevent it is by talking about it, listening, learning the signs and learning what to recognize.

“We’ve stigmatized mental health. To destigmatize it we need to recognize that many people struggle and it is ok to reach out for help,” Ryan said.

The ripple effect addressed in the film shows how suicide touches everyone around that person. Both women have lost friends and family to suicide and both say the deaths sent waves through their communities.

“If my brother had known how many people it was going to hurt he would have never done it,” Ryan said. “It brings that light to people in the audience who may have thought about it and they will see what the ripple effect of that would be.”

Little has lost 10 family and friends to suicide in 10 years. She said she founded her company to help give people hope.

“By sharing my story, by helping to spread a message of hope and get them unstuck in their life, that is my mission,” she said.