County commission recognizes Samuel Jenkins

Former commissioner died Feb. 25

By Cliff McCollum
Posted 3/14/17

The Baldwin County Commission took time to recognize and remember one of its own Tuesday morning, as commissioners passed a resolution recognizing the life and legacy of former Baldwin County …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

County commission recognizes Samuel Jenkins

Former commissioner died Feb. 25

Posted

The Baldwin County Commission took time to recognize and remember one of its own Tuesday morning, as commissioners passed a resolution recognizing the life and legacy of former Baldwin County Commissioner Samuel Jenkins Sr.

Jenkins, who lived in Daphne, died Feb. 25, and Commissioner Frank Burt, who served with Jenkins during his time on the commission, said he was a model for what elected officials should be.

“He always said ‘If it’s legal and it’s right, I’ll do it,’” Burt said. “He was truly a person who worked for the people of his district and the county at large.”

Jenkins was the first black person to serve as commissioner and chairman of the commission, holding his seat from 1988 to 2000.

Jenkins was born in Loxley in 1926. He served in the military during World War II in the Army, where he obtained the rank of Technician IV from 1945 through 1946 in the Pacific Theater.

Upon his return to Baldwin County, Jenkins worked as a potato farmer, independent trucker, rural industrial specialist for the Alabama State Employment Service, superintendent of operations for the Del Monte Banana Company and as union president for the Banana Holders Local 1516 in Mobile.

Jenkins also held several service roles in organizations throughout the area. He served as a board member for the Welfare Pension Board for the International Longshoreman’s Association of Counties, the Public Lands Steering Committee for the National Association of Counties, the Baldwin County Solid Waste Disposal Authority and the Alabama State Democratic Executive Committee.

Jenkins was a faithful member of Mount Aid Baptist Church.

Each member of the commission took time to praise Jenkins for his role on the commission and his help to people across Baldwin County.

Commissioner Tucker Dorsey said Jenkins had always been helpful to him throughout Dorsey’s time on the commission.

“He was always willing to share his thoughts and give his advice, which I gladly took,” Dorsey said. “He had a wealth of wisdom about our county and how it ran, and he will certainly be missed by all of us.”

Commission Chairman Chris Elliott said even after Jenkins left the commission, he would still travel to Bay Minette for meetings and sit right on the front row.

“He just always came to check on us and make sure we were doing our jobs,” Elliott said. “We always appreciated his continued interest and his friendship.”